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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
that facility about 14 years and we'll be welcoming 40 members from the u.s. marine corps, 20 members from the u.s. navy, 10 members the u.s. coast guard, where we will then partner with them and cross train them and use our techniques, reaching technical rescue and high and low rescue being demonstrated in display. we will also be having some of our u.s. navy personnel on ride-alongs with members on our ambulances, fire engines and trucks to continue with our cross training. so, it gives me great pride to be here to continue to serve as the fire chief, to welcome the military, and to say thank you to all of you. here's to an enjoyable fun-filled busy weekend. all the best, and thank you for your service. (applause) >> i wanted chief to tell you about that training. we first did it in 2010, search and rescue which we knew was a problem in haiti in the earth wake in the recovery. and like they say in san francisco, the fire department, we know how to do it, but when the big earthquake hits, we're all going to be victims and we want to make sure that anybody that potentially could come in to help di
this morning on the green ship of our u.s. navy. it's very appropriate that it be here heading the fleet in san francisco. admiral beeman, thank you very much for your leadership. it is impressive what we are accomplishing. just two years ago, we started with an understanding that our military, the coast guard, the u.s. navy, the marine corps, had something that we really needed. it's called logistics expertise. and we recognized that and with the help of our fleet week association, with the help of our honorary chair, former secretary of state george scholtz, along with senator feinstein who started fleet week, we began to appreciate in addition to appreciating the men and women in uniform and the wonderful attributes of having fleet week and the blue angels and the parade of ships, we could also be working on something very important to this city. all across the world there are examples after example and i know the men and women and leadership of the uss macon know this after their tour of duty these past months, all over the world there are disasters and emergencies that we are res
believe that the u.s. navy is capable of maintaining that unambiguous military strength. as we sit here this morning aboard the uss macon island, in san francisco bay, looking out to the pacific, it is easy to believe that the united states is, in fact, a pacific power and that to keep it that way we will maintain the best damn navy in the world. thank you very much. (applause)speaker .... >> now i'm going to introduce our next speaker, major general melvin spee splt e i've known melvin for a number of years, obviously we served together in the marine corps. i can tell you he's been with fleet week for 3 years now and the one thing about mel, he's got a lot of ideas and he accepts no as an interim answer because a lot of things that he wanted to do to make fleet week better originally the answer from authorities was no. and he made some amazing things happen just through his will. a commander can will things to happen. and i really want to thank you, mel, for that whole peer to peer medical exchange was your idea and it was just a huge hit and i thank you so much for that. he's offe
the women. so we created the female engagement team. with our interagency partners, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the afghans, additionally we reached out to the private sector for partnerships, and not for profits to deliver things that we weren't capable of delivering or to cover gaps that arose as we implemented the plan. we implemented the plan through 17 teams through helman and our two female engagement teams. this is actually just scrolling pictures. sometimes a picture says a thousand words and i don't want to take you down the whole history of a year but i wanted to talk to you about how we framed this plan. this plan was framed into 5 pillars and the 5 pillars were students and parents, we attempted to build buy in and assure safety among the students. there was lots of fear of reprisals. by sending your kids to school there was fear that the taliban was going to knock on your door and let you know that that wasn't allowed. previously the taliban had instituted a medrossas so their only forms of education were religious schools
that responded to this rubble pile. we had urban search and rescue, u.s. coast guard, and this provided an opportunity for our military to work with the federal and state partners there in learning how to interact with their agencies and also being able to learn some of the different capabilities that they have in using their equipment. we also had some medical partners there where they were able to locate and evacuate the medical patients and that also showed a great partnership. this is the health care association for hawaii and this is the part of the agency that helped us coordinate the medical response part of this. they were able to conduct a 50-bed disaster medical assistance team hospital on the island of oahu and this allowed the state of hawaii to be able to exercise their state-wide disaster drill. one of the things that hawaii has never been able to do is to be able to practice together in one live exercise. they have all of their processes, how they're going to respond in a local disaster situation, but they have never been able to really put that to use. and being able
think he made a sacred intention to light that message to the world, that we can't go back. >>> in the u.s. today we have so much to be proud of. the last door that i knocked on on november the 5th campaigning for president obama, a dignified elderly 92 year old woman named bernice opened the door in my get out the vote identification, identified her supporting equality. and she looked at me and she looked at my official obama pen that said lgbt for obama and she looked at me with tears in her eyes and she said, our time has really come, hasn't it? we both cried. that moment with bernice takes some of the pain of this day away. on this day i always feel a heightened affinity with my uncle for this was that night 34 years ago that i had to first reflect on my own conversations with harvey. anyone who has had conversations with harvey will know, you cannot get away easy. and he didn't let me as a teenager get away easy either. i had to reflect about the meaning of those conversations. it was a day that i had to look hard at what his love and guidance would mean to me that that was gone, that
hands, more acceptance, more tolerance, as we wait with great anxiousness on our u.s. supreme court to exhibit their tolerance in our united states for the same-sex marriage that we all deserve. [ applause ] i also wanted to again, acknowledge that this is the season of giving, and hope that you will join us from now to the end of january, and a donation in the city hall when you have to visit, we have canisters for those who need food for this season, also if you would join us in the weekend of december 15th and 16th, we are going to have family orientation outside with snow day here in city hall. we are bringing snow in again. and we are going to enjoy this with our snow day, december 15th and 16th, you are all welcome to come and bring the kids and all of the extended families. and if i may say again, these holidays and what the tree represent is the best hope and wishes. the holidays should never be about ourselves. what reminds us and what this tree will continue doing, is that you have to remember others that are less fortunate, and share our hearts and our minds and our resou
's for toys sold in the united states, so regardless of where the manufacturer is, if they're sold in the u.s., they have to comply with those standards, other countries could well have different laws on their shelves and my guess would be vary from laws that would be more health protective to less fighters to join us. >> i have two questions, i'll keep them brief. we can't control where our fire houses are and our fire house is a block off the freeway, we do replace our h fact filters every five mother and is they're jet black when we replace them every three months, it is a big concern, how do we reduce our exposure when we're a block right off the freeway, we're bumper to bump traffic, and there are some fire houses that are literally underneath the freeway so how do we reduce that exposure, air filters, if so, what kind of air filters? >> you're getting beyond our technical knowledge of our filtration, but you know, it might be somebody to consult with somebody with expertise in air filtration for indoor air of course, maybe replacing those filters more often, you know, some very basic t
are allowed to be in there, the u.s. has banned 11 things in cosmetics, also requiring premarket safety, tests of ingredients, full labeling including everything that's in fragrance and considering of vulnerable populations when deciding what's safe and what's not, so those are some important things that happen a lot. there are actually three different bills on personal care products in congress right now, there's the good bill, which does these things, there's the newt ra bill which keeps the status quo and then what's kind of a bad bill, and they all sound like they're good because they all sound like, you know, safety of chemicals in cosmetic, they all have those words but they don't really all do that so i think it's also important as you're thinking about these things to go to a reputable organization that you trust is going to give you real information and support the kinds of laws that they're supporting rather than one that's maybe a bill posed by the industry that, guess what, wants to be self-regulating. okay, so now we are moving to the driveway, and this is really interesting becau
are the first major u.s. city to (inaudible) post katrina where he saw firsthand where a critical role these systems played in the city's recovery. i am honored to chair the council because i feel it's crucial that the public sector work side by side with our private sector partners to do everything we can today to ensure we will meet the needs of our residents in the days, weeks and years after a disaster. the objective of the lifeline council are to develop and improve collaboration in the city and county across regions regularly -- to develop and improve collaboration in the city and across the region by regularly convening a group of senior level operation officers of local and regional life line providers, understanding intersystem dependencies of enhancing planning, restoration and reconstruction, share information about the recovery plans and priorities and establish coordination process for life lines restoration and recovery following a major disaster. i'm going to go back to the last slide and just say today's conversation i want to focus around the specific challenges that
about at the top of the trees. that's what we found. the cost was close to 30 billion u.s. dollars. how we organize, well, we have something similar that you have. we have the national emergency office under the internal affair minister and they have offices in the different counties, in the different places in chile this emergency office request aid directly to the joint chief of staff and joint chief of staff to the army, navy or air force and then we move the pieces to put the aid where they need it. the scenario, the beginning when we face this was the same thing we are talking about in this seminar. the necessity was access because everything was, the delivery was absolutely hampered because of the roads so we have to clean it. water, food, electricity and communications. another need at that time to do that is field hospital generators, housing, sat coms, purifying water systems and mobile bridges. so the force was at the beginning just to distribute the aid and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the a
owners and private land owners as well as on state and cooperating with our federal agencies with the u.s. forest service. so two-fold program, vegetation management, we aggressively pursue that, but also from a public education stand point. what we find in these large scale incidents, the public is going to have to be self-sustaining and self-supporting. they need to be prepared. we try to educate them in respect that we say we'll provide the offense, you provide the defense. we talk to them about hardening their structures in a defensive measure against wild land fires. a lot of it is public education, survivability, building standards, but predominately our focus is putting the onus on the land owner, putting the onus on the private property owner, we will attempt to protect your home but the days of staying and defending your home and killing our fire fighters are done. we will not stand and defend a house that has not been prepared by a land owner and die for it. we don't do that any more. that's one of our doctrinal changes and we set forth some new guidelines with that. >>
the mayor, i get to join the other u.s. conference of mar and talk proudly of our diversity in this city, and how it helps me run this city. * mayors and now for lesbian, gay, and transgender individuals to take up the responsibilities and have the responsibility of other people's lives that they are responsible for in their official capacities, this would make mayor moscone and supervisor milk very proud of us. and in the week, perhaps less than a week, we have another historic opportunity for this country as we take up this opportunity of hopefully, we join together to see that marriage equality becomes the law of this land. [cheering and applauding] >> we have that opportunity to do so. and i think everybody who holds office or holds an appointed position in the city is proud to see this diversity. this is what we have worked so hard, so many struggles. and we still remind ourselves of the night of the assassination and what had occurred and how this city was so divided. i believe now that there is such a great unity. when we talk about diversity in the city, how that unity transform
piece. this is the bill largest darkroom in the u.s.. >> there are a lot of people that want to get into that dark room. >> i think it is the heart of this place. you feel it when you come in. >> the people who just started taking pictures, so this is really an intersection for many generations of photographers and this is a great place to learn because if you need people from different areas and also everyone who works here is working in photography. >> we get to build the community here. this is different. first of all, this is a great location. it is in a less-populated area. >> of lot of people come here just so that they can participate in this program. it is a great opportunity for people who have a little bit of photographic experience. the people have a lot, they can really come together and share a love and a passion. >> we offer everything from traditional black and white darkrooms to learning how to process your first roll of film. we offer classes and workshops in digital camera, digital printing. we offer classes basically in the shooting, ton the town at night, treasur
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)